Saturday, March 19, 2011

Billbergia distachia

Billbergia distachia is a bromeliad that blooms in late winter or early spring. It has distinctive dangling flowers.
The stalk of the inflorescence is held erect, along with the pink bracts. The greenish flowers are tipped with blue, and sway freely in the breezes. The green leaves are lightly spotted.
This species develops leaf damage when frost settles on the plant, but that doesn't prevent it from blooming profusely once the weather starts to warm.

9 comments:

lotusleaf said...

Very pretty. You have a good collection of bromeliads.

RBell said...

Interesting. You B. nutans blooms appear to spread out on a longer, zig-zag stem whereas mine tend to hang in tight, downward-pointing clusters. I see both types pictured online. Any idea re: the difference?

Grower Jim said...

RBell: Interesting observation. This species grows over a wide swath of South America in a range of climatic conditions. Apparently, this has given rise to many variations within the species.

Giga said...

You can grow a flower pot just in the house and certainly will not be so big. Nice to see the plants in the garden other than in Poland. Yours

Susan said...

Grower Jim...Thanks to you I have been able to identify the many bromeliads I have received from friends...that I did not know the names of. I've got this beauty blooming right now, too.

Anonymous said...

I live in Burbank, CA. Saw this plant in Descanso Gardens, Glendale, CA and loved it. But I need to know, does it require full sun or can it take no sun. I have both and no in between.

Grower Jim said...

Anonymous: It should be able to take either sun or shade. In sun, the plant will look best if you water more frequently.

SiestaSister said...

Grower Jim...maybe you can help me. Most of my bromeliads did not bloom last year. What can I do to get them to bloom? Some of them were getting too much afternoon sun so I have moved them to shadier locations.

Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks!

Grower Jim said...

SiestaSister: The change in location may help, depending on the varieties you have. If you also divided them when you moved them, that should help stimulate new growth that will provide blooms as the plants mature.

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