Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Billbergia Windii

This is one of my favorite little bromeliads:  Billbergia 'Windii'.  The plants only grow about a foot tall but the pendulous flower spike can reach nearly two feet in length!  They are great for hanging baskets or planted along a low wall where the blooms can spill over.  They multiply rapidly and individual plants will bloom at various times throughout the year.  These came through freezing temps in the mid to upper 20s F with no damage this winter so they are moving higher on my list of favorites.  They grow well in shade or filtered sun and require no additional care.  Rainfall generally provides sufficient moisture.



Here is the flower spike as it's emerging from the foliage and starting to arch over.
The above grouping is in bloom right now.  These are planted on sloping ground above the fish pond so the flowers can hang down and show themselves nicely.

The pink bracts open out to reveal the blue and green flowers inside.  What a beauty!



Here are my other posts on bromeliads

12 comments:

NanaK said...

I think I may have these. They haven't bloomed for me yet so I'll have to check back to this post when they do. I don't have id on most of my broms. Thanks for posting this.

The Rainforest Gardener said...

I think i have a hybrid of this one- the same flowers but more mottling. I guess mine are in more light too.

africanaussie said...

Oh I have this one! - my flower didnt last for very long though. http://africanaussie.blogspot.com/2009/11/spicy-weekend.html
I rescued some very mottled old plants from a neighbour and they have started to have pups and give off a better colour. Eventually they lost the spots on the leaves which must have been a deficiency. They do have a bit of a stripe on the leaves now, but they are very happy - hope I get more flowers soon as they are really beautiful.

Ami said...

Nice bromeliad! The flowers are so pretty too! I need to keep an eye on this one in my local nursery. You have a very beautiful bromeliad collection!

RBell said...

Did I hear "shade"! I have Billbergia nutans which is also starting to bloom and did well outside this winter (hope to post a picture in my blog tonight). But your B. windii appears to grow larger (both in leaves and flowers). I'm going to have to keep an eye for these!

Wilbert said...

Hoping to uncover the identity of the single 'flamingo head' plant that has taken it upon it self to decorate my garden with spectacular gusto over the years, I was directed by Google-images to Billbergia saundersii and this inspiring blog/site.
It didn't take long for me to realize, in order to achieve complete happiness for myself and my family of Billbergia saundersii, securing every bromeliad in your catalogue is quintessential.

You probably understand my distress to read your bromeliads can not be shipped to California.

Could you please educate me why that is or, preferably change your mind about it?

Grower Jim said...

Wilbert: California has among the strictest plant import requirements of any state. While it is possible to send plants there, additional inspections and fees are required, and also a quarantine period for certain types of plants. For a large order, this may not be insurmountable. If you are interested, contact me via the email on my profile and I can send you all the details.

shrink on the couch said...

Thanks so much for your post on the billburgia windii. You helped me identify my bromeliad because I couldn't for the life of me remember what type of plant let alone the specific name.

A landscape architect friend once commented how nicely it was blooming and what did I do to get it to do so well. My answer - neglect? It's very root bound. Do you have any guidance regarding when to divide or how to divide? Thank you!

Grower Jim said...

shrink on the couch, you really only need to divide them when the pups start growing over the sides of the pot. However, the plants will grow faster and more vigorously if you don't wait quite that long! Just cut through the rhizome wherever you want to divide the clump and pull the sections apart. Bromeliads are very forgiving and success is virtually guaranteed!

smallhousebiggarden said...

Well I just found the info I needed re: the brom about which I emailed you 10mins ago! I had mistakenly thought these were Aechmeas but your wonderful blog has informed me otherwise! Many thanks!

The Hollow said...

Have been trying for 2weeks to identify this plant. What zones will they survive in? A family member in south Mississippi has several pot of these and is willing to share. I live in central Mississippi.

Grower Jim said...

Billbergias will survive brief, light freezes without damage, but longer or more severe cold spells will cause dieback of leaves and young offsets. In your climate it may be wise to keep them in pots so they can be easily moved to a protected area during cold weather.

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